Please Return if Found: Large Ball of Fire called The Sun.

Originally Published 6.25.14  Republished 11/16

Once upon a time, in this very land of this very state called Wisconsin, there was a large ball of fire in the sky called The Sun.  It was very far away so it wasn't scary, but gently warmed this place called Earth.  Children played outside and had lemonade stands.  People went to pools to quench their parched bodies. Flowers and trees and plants loved The Sun, it helped them grow into beautiful rainbow colored splashes.  

© 2016 Patrice Herbst

© 2016 Patrice Herbst

 

It provided The Golden Hour, that time in the early morning when it casts a pinkish glow (at least that's what I'm told.  I've never been up early enough to see it for myself...) and then just before sunset when shadows are long and beautiful. It warmed our bodies, our homes, our hearts and our spirits.  But it would appear it has gone missing.

© 2016 Patrice Herbst

© 2016 Patrice Herbst

After what was most definitely The Longest Winter Any Wisconsinite Can Remember, we were ready.  This was the winter that just WOULDN'T LET GO.  It clenched the state with it's mighty grip and clung to us right through Spring.  We shrugged our shoulders and knowing it won't last forever, eventually The Sun will prevail and save us, melting every single snowflake into the earth for the trees to drink its life-giving nectar after the long hard winter.  And for a few days, that repetitive cycle of Mother Nature actually worked.  Snow melted, grass turned green, leaves sprouted on trees.  Garden centers opened, full of beautiful colored plants called Hope.  We biked, we ran, we packed away the woolens.  We cleaned up our yards and out our gutters.  We brought out the lawn furniture, the hummingbird feeders, the hoses.  We washed the dried slush from our cars and windows, and looked forward to those three months of glorious sun-warmed days called Summer.  Those few days, we called Spring.  

© 2016 Patrice Herbst

© 2016 Patrice Herbst

We're a hardy bunch, Wisconsinites are, show us one day at 58 degrees We're a hardy bunch, Wisconsinites are, show us one day at 58 degrees and sun and I'll show you an entire state outfitted in shorts, t-shirts and flip-flops.  We acclimate to the cold unforgiving waters of Lake Michigan as if it's a heated backyard pool.  We actually MAKE snow if we don't have enough to play in.  But come June 1st, we expect warm sunny days, gardens that prosper under the guidance of a green thumb and The Sun, and activities outdoors that don't include long underwear, jackets, umbrellas, knee-high boots and buckets for bailing.  It's not too much to ask really, that The Sun be ours for just a few brief months.  After all, we aren't Seattle or London, notorious zones for their cloudy atmosphere.  But here we are nearly the end of June, and it's been weeks of clouds and rain and fog and damp dank junk.  On occasion one can look on the "bright side" and see the beauty of misted trees gently blending with the fogged horizon, or come to a new appreciation of how atmosphere changes our perception of color.  But in general, we'd trade weeks of that overly renewed appreciation for a slice of The Sun. Because no matter how you slice it, we all know that weeks and weeks of rain are a mosquito's BFF.  And there Will be mosquitos of nuclear-size proportions this year, because they have become the new hardy Wisconsinites.  and sun and I'll show you an entire state outfitted in shorts, t-shirts and flip-flops.  We acclimate to the cold unforgiving waters of Lake Michigan as if it's a heated backyard pool.  We actually MAKE snow if we don't have enough to play in.  But come June 1st, we expect warm sunny days, gardens that prosper under the guidance of a green thumb and The Sun, and activities outdoors that don't include long underwear, jackets, umbrellas, knee-high boots and buckets for bailing.  It's not too much to ask really, that The Sun be ours for just a few brief months.  After all, we aren't Seattle or London, notorious zones for their cloudy atmosphere.  But here we are nearly the end of June, and it's been weeks of clouds and rain and fog and damp dank junk.  On occasion one can look on the "bright side" and see the beauty of misted trees gently blending with the fogged horizon, or come to a new appreciation of how atmosphere changes our perception of color.  But in general, we'd trade weeks of that overly renewed appreciation for a slice of The Sun. Because no matter how you slice it, we all know that weeks and weeks of rain are a mosquito's BFF.  And there Will be mosquitos of nuclear-size proportions this year, because they have become the new hardy Wisconsinites.  

So if you find The Sun somewhere, please consider returning it to Wisconsin for just a short time.  We need it to grow and thrive, to bask in, to breathe in, to play in just once in a while.  We need it to grow our children, warm our faces, nurture our spirits in preparation for the winter ahead.  

 

Meanwhile, I think I'm going to buy fake sunlight.  I heard it comes in a box in the form of a bright light full spectrum light therapy light.  I'm not taking any more chances.  Either that or I'm going into a cloud-induced hibernation.  Wake me when the sun comes out.....Love to All!

 

PS: Lucky Bird Update:  For those of you who followed along with Lucky Bird, I am happy to report she has most likely been sighted within the small community of pigeons I had hoped she would find.  She lives high atop the inside of an abandoned silo about two miles away from my studio.  I miss her silly gibberish, her penchant for feet attacks and her ever-entertaining bath rituals. Truth be told, I do not miss the extraordinary amount of pigeon "output" or the fact I no longer had a studio but a very nice birdhouse in it's place.  I am especially grateful to the kind friend who came up with the perfect place to set her free, and finally, after a recent trip to the zoo, I was thankful my heart allowed her the thrill of freedom she deserved no matter the harsh eventual outcome.  She truly is, one Lucky Bird.